Fish Farm Update – August 2018

1.BC government: Select Standing Committee on Agriculture, Fish and Food
On May 31, 2018, the legislative assembly tasked the Select Standing Committee on Agriculture, Fish and Food with conducting consultations to examine the health, habitat and management of wild salmon, as well as the sustainability of the wild salmon industry in British Columbia.

BC Wild Salmon Advisory Council
On June 11, 2018, the government established the Wild Salmon Advisory Council. It is intended to bring experts together to help develop a wild salmon strategy to protect B.C. salmon. 14 members: co-chairs Doug Routley, MLA and Chief Marilyn Slett of the Heiltsuk First Nation. The Advisory Council will develop and write an options paper on a made-in-B.C. wild salmon strategy.

The Advisory Council will be supported by the Wild Salmon Secretariat, which includes staff from the Office of the Premier and contracted support from B.C. Coastal First Nations. The Wild Salmon Secretariat’s options paper will be presented to the Select Standing Committee on Agriculture, Fish and Food.

2.BC government: Decision to renew fish farm licenses

June 22, 2018. The BC government announced that it will give 20 fish farms 4 years to establish i) that their operations meet federal DFO standards and don’t endanger wild salmon, and ii) consent from local First Nations to operate on their territories. Until 2022 the province will renew these licenses on a month-to-month basis. This will bring the timing of provincial licensing into sinc with federal DFO licenses.

Vancouver Sun, June 27 Re: B.C. government sets 2022 deadline for coastal fish farms.
“This decision is disastrous for wild salmon and communities all along their migration routes. Wild salmon are in trouble; First Nations, the Cohen Commission, stream keepers, hatcheries, commercial and sports fishers, tourism operators and municipalities could not be clearer about this. It appears that the provincial government is prepared to gamble with the very existence of wild salmon.
This is not the time to be cautious, and this was a cautious decision. The province could have challenged the industry bias of Fisheries and Oceans Canada and used its licensing power to force it to reconsider its responsibility for wild salmon. Rather, they appear to have simply set the stage for a four-year battle that’s weighted on the industry side.
The NDP also seems prepared to take Indigenous people through a long, expensive legal process rather than act quickly on their clear lack of consent.
Alice de Wolff, Comox Valley Council of Canadians, Courtenay” Continue reading

Community Action Award 2018

Each year the Comox Valley Chapter presents the Community Action Award to a person or group in the Valley.  This year we will be presenting the award at our AGM on November 22.

We would like to receive your nomination for this award. Include a short paragraph that gives:

  • the length of time the group or individual has been active
  • the Canadian values that have been demonstrated
  • the progressive action in the community

Send your nomination by November 1 to cvcouncilofcanadians@gmail.com

Past recipients of the Community Action Award are:
2007 – Valley Greens
2008 –Citizens for Quality Health Care
2009 – Food Not Bombs
2010 – Coal Watch
2011 – Water Watch
2012 – CV Seed Savers
2013 – Dawn to Dawn
2014 – Gwyn Frayne
2015 – Walking with Our Sisters K’ómoks
2016 – Janet Fairbanks and Wayne Bradley
2017 – Project Watershed

 

 

Thank You!

The CV Council of Canadians wishes to thank all the local businesses, organizations and individuals who generously donated to the Chapter’s Oh Canada Team Trivia Night Fundraiser.

Bouquets of gratitude to businesses ranging from Watershed Sentinel, Sure Copy, Dobson’s Lawns & Gardens, Comox Valley Golf Club and Kask Publishing to local eateries the Filberg Summer Kitchen & Custom Gourmet Catering, Tastefully Local & Angelina’s Gourmet, White Whale and Pizzeria Guerrilla.

The generosity of Project Watershed, Comox Valley Youth Music Centre (CYMC) and individuals Lynda Smith – Lawn to Food, Cori Sandler – Cori Sandler Pottery, Vivian Cruise, Pam Lengyel and Barb Berger added to the success of the evening’s event.

To Cumberland merchants Seeds Grocery, Waverly Hotel, Cumberland Recreation, 4 Quarters Restaurant and Cumberland Bakery, Cumberland Museum, Dodge City Cycles, Dawn Copeman, Cumberland Brewing Company, Rider’s Pizza and The Wandering Moose Café huge thanks for your generous support.

Delicious thanks to the Comox Valley Farmers’ Market and vendors for their generous donations – Natural Pastures Cheese, As You Like It Products & Catering, Tin Town Tacos, Fiesta Greenhouses, Celiam Acres, Bates Beach, Big D’s Honey, Cocoa Nuts Cappuccino Bar, McClintocks Farm and Merville Organics.

Kudos goes to Trivia Master Michael Walton and partner Marianne Bell for challenging our knowledge of Canadiana.

As always it was a pleasure working with the staff and custodians at the Florence Filberg Centre – they really are wonderful team!

Thank you to all the volunteers and the 18 tables of great team trivia players!

It was a successful evening due to your support!

Damming the Peace

An Evening with Wendy Holm, Agrologist and Author

The Comox Valley Chapter of the Council of Canadians welcomes agrologist and author Wendy Holm to Courtenay on Wednesday, July 11, to discuss her latest and critically acclaimed book, Damming the Peace – The Hidden Costs of the Site C Dam.

In December 2017, the provincial government, in a decision that shocked many British Columbians, announced they would continue with the construction of Site C. This decision was reached despite the looming, unanswered questions regarding the estimated costs and the dubious long-term, economic viability of the project.

We need the power, of that there’s no mistake – unless you ignore the urgency of the climate crisis. We can find power elsewhere and we can do it without sacrificing nature and wildlife, without sacrificing farmland and without sacrificing the territorial right and cultural wealth of First Nations, writes author Holm.

Damming the Peace – The Hidden Costs of the Site C Dam, includes Holm’s own critical observations and presents the independent voices of citizen experts who, after extensive research, describe the far-reaching impacts of the dam.

The book exposes potential links to the project that range from Site C’s role in Canada’s climate change strategy, natural gas extraction, and fracking, to continental water sharing and the role large projects play in the corruption of governments.

The on-going opposition by landowners, legal challenges by First Nations, cost over-runs and unstable geological conditions all indicate that the future of BC’s most expensive infrastructure project is, and should be, in question.

Site C is an economic white elephant … we do not need the Site C dam. It is time to close the project down, writes Holm in Damming the Peace. To continue will have devastating, irreversible consequences for all of us.

Prominent water activist and Honourary Chair of the Council of Canadians, Maude Barlow says of the book, “The fight to stop Site C is not over. Damming the Peace is our roadmap.”

Holm’s book tour to the Comox Valley, sponsored by the CV Council of Canadians will take place Wed., July 11, at 7:00 pm in the Rotary Hall, Filberg Centre, 411 Anderton Ave, Courtenay. Holm is donating proceeds from the sale of Damming the Peace to the Nun Wa Dee Stewardship Society to support the legal costs of the Prophet River and West Moberly First Nations.

She will be available to sign copies of her book before and after the event. Doors open 6:30 pm.

Wendy Holm is a professional agrologist (retired), an award-winning national columnist, a double Queen’s medalist, a distinguished UBC alumna, past president of the B.C. Institute of Agrologists and B.C. Agrologist of the Year in 2000. She provided expert testimony before the Joint Federal Provincial Panel on the agricultural impact of the Site C project.