A Conversation With Maude Barlow

When: October 22 from 11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Where: K’omoks Band Hall, 3320 Comox Rd., Courtenay (Map)
Admission is free – please bring a friend!

Maude Barlow, bestselling author, activist, and Honorary Chair of the Council of Canadians will be with us in the Comox Valley on October 22 to talk about the possible impact of the federal election and re-focus ourselves on the public protection of water.
Whose Water Is It Anyway? book coverMaude is touring the country, introducing communities to her new book “Whose Water Is It, Anyway:  Taking Water Protection into Public Hands”.   In it, she details how communities around the world are responding to the urgent need to protect fresh water.  The book provides an updated road map for communities and organizations to take action on recognizing water and sanitation as human rights, phasing out the sale or use of bottled water, and protecting publicly financed, owned and operated water and wastewater services.

Two Comox Valley Communities – Cumberland and Comox – committed themselves to the protection of water in 2012 by becoming Blue Communities.  Maude will recognize their efforts as being among the first to make this commitment.  They have since been joined by communities that include 15 million people, including Paris, Montreal, Bern, Berlin, Munich, Thessaloniki, the World Council of Churches, and McGill University, among many others.

We recognize that October 22 is the morning after the election, but what better way to spend it than in the company of Maude and others who are concerned about our water?”, says Alice de Wolff, Steering Committee member, Comox Valley Council of Canadians.   Bruce Gibbons of Merville Water Guardians will co-chair the event and provide us with updates on the Union of BC Municipalities resolution to stop the approval of licenses for bottling and sale of groundwater.

About Maude Barlow.
As Naomi Klein says “Maude Barlow is one of our planet’s greatest water defenders”.  She is the international bestselling author of 19 books, including the bestselling Blue Water trilogy. She is the Honorary Chair of both the Council of Canadians and Washington-based Food and Water Watch. She is on the executive committee of the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and is a Councillor with the World Future Council. In 2008–09, she served as Senior Adviser on Water to the 63rd President of the UN General Assembly and was a leader in the campaign to have water recognized as a human right by the UN. In 2005, she won the prestigious Right Livelihood Award, which is known as the “alternative Nobel.”

This event is co-hosted by the Comox Valley Chapter of the Council of Canadians. This tour stop is sponsored in part by Laughing Oyster Books.

LNG, Fracking, and the Comox Valley Connection

More Than Just a Pipeline

Forum to explore LNG (Liquid Natural Gas), Fracking,

and the Comox Valley connection

February 27, 7 PM, Florence Filberg Centre, Courtenay

fracking.jpg

Last Tuesday (February 5) the Comox Valley Regional District heard a presentation by Steelhead LNG.  Company representatives outlined a pipeline proposal that would see 1000 km of pipe constructed to carry gas from northern BC to Powell River, under the Salish Sea, and through either the Comox Valley or a more southerly point to an LNG export facility on the West Coast of Vancouver Island.  The presentation made it clear that the project could have considerable impact on the Comox Valley and our sister communities along the Salish Sea and the Alberni Inlet.

On February 27, the public is invited to a forum discussion on why this is project involves more than just a pipeline. Five presenters will speak about  “LNG, Fracking, and the Comox Valley Connection.”

Smithers resident Michael Sawyer has spent decades as an environmental consultant in the oil and gas sector in Alberta, and will speak about the upstream effects of LNG projects (including LNG Canada and the Coastal GasLink pipeline slated to supply it), as well as the life-cycle costs to the public of such projects.

Richard Wright, Wilps Luutkudziiwus is the Spokesperson from Madii Lii Centre in Gitxsan territory in northern BC.  He will discuss the Indigenous rights context surrounding extractive projects, including issues with current federal and provincial approval processes, and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Well-known journalist and filmmaker Damien Gillis will speak to the impact of fracking  (hydraulic fracturing) on land and water.

Bernadette and Keith Wyton of the Barkley Sound Alliance will focus on the project’s impact at its end-point at the Kwispaa LNG export facility. They will speak about the protections in place and opposition to the proposal.

The forum is open to all and will take place from 7-9 pm in the Conference Room of the Florence Filberg Centre, 411 Anderton Avenue in Courtenay. It is co-hosted by the Watershed Sentinel magazine, the Council of Canadians – Comox Valley Chapter, and the Glasswaters Foundation.

For more information contact Alice de Wolff, alicedewolff@gmail.com  or Delores Broten, 250-339-6117, delores@watershedsentinel.ca

Further reading:

2nd Comox Valley Sustainability Forum

On October 20, voters in the Comox Valley will be electing mayors, councillors, school district board members and electoral area directors.

Local government, be it in a village, town, city or electoral area, shapes the community it serves with its decision making. Therefore, it’s critical we ensure our elected officials adopt policies and bylaws that will form the basis for creating both a sustainable community and environment, not only for ourselves but for future generations.

The CV Global Awareness Network, CV Council of Canadians and Imagine Comox Valley invite the public, members of local government and candidates standing for office in the October municipal elections to learn more about the possibilities of reaching sustainable solutions to current issues and problems being faced in the Comox Valley in their second Sustainability Forum on Wednesday Sept. 19th at 7 PM. Continue reading

Damming the Peace

An Evening with Wendy Holm, Agrologist and Author

The Comox Valley Chapter of the Council of Canadians welcomes agrologist and author Wendy Holm to Courtenay on Wednesday, July 11, to discuss her latest and critically acclaimed book, Damming the Peace – The Hidden Costs of the Site C Dam.

In December 2017, the provincial government, in a decision that shocked many British Columbians, announced they would continue with the construction of Site C. This decision was reached despite the looming, unanswered questions regarding the estimated costs and the dubious long-term, economic viability of the project.

We need the power, of that there’s no mistake – unless you ignore the urgency of the climate crisis. We can find power elsewhere and we can do it without sacrificing nature and wildlife, without sacrificing farmland and without sacrificing the territorial right and cultural wealth of First Nations, writes author Holm.

Damming the Peace – The Hidden Costs of the Site C Dam, includes Holm’s own critical observations and presents the independent voices of citizen experts who, after extensive research, describe the far-reaching impacts of the dam.

The book exposes potential links to the project that range from Site C’s role in Canada’s climate change strategy, natural gas extraction, and fracking, to continental water sharing and the role large projects play in the corruption of governments.

The on-going opposition by landowners, legal challenges by First Nations, cost over-runs and unstable geological conditions all indicate that the future of BC’s most expensive infrastructure project is, and should be, in question.

Site C is an economic white elephant … we do not need the Site C dam. It is time to close the project down, writes Holm in Damming the Peace. To continue will have devastating, irreversible consequences for all of us.

Prominent water activist and Honourary Chair of the Council of Canadians, Maude Barlow says of the book, “The fight to stop Site C is not over. Damming the Peace is our roadmap.”

Holm’s book tour to the Comox Valley, sponsored by the CV Council of Canadians will take place Wed., July 11, at 7:00 pm in the Rotary Hall, Filberg Centre, 411 Anderton Ave, Courtenay. Holm is donating proceeds from the sale of Damming the Peace to the Nun Wa Dee Stewardship Society to support the legal costs of the Prophet River and West Moberly First Nations.

She will be available to sign copies of her book before and after the event. Doors open 6:30 pm.

Wendy Holm is a professional agrologist (retired), an award-winning national columnist, a double Queen’s medalist, a distinguished UBC alumna, past president of the B.C. Institute of Agrologists and B.C. Agrologist of the Year in 2000. She provided expert testimony before the Joint Federal Provincial Panel on the agricultural impact of the Site C project.