A Conversation With Maude Barlow

When: October 22 from 11:45 a.m. to 1:30 p.m.
Where: K’omoks Band Hall, 3320 Comox Rd., Courtenay (Map)
Admission is free – please bring a friend!

Maude Barlow, bestselling author, activist, and Honorary Chair of the Council of Canadians will be with us in the Comox Valley on October 22 to talk about the possible impact of the federal election and re-focus ourselves on the public protection of water.
Whose Water Is It Anyway? book coverMaude is touring the country, introducing communities to her new book “Whose Water Is It, Anyway:  Taking Water Protection into Public Hands”.   In it, she details how communities around the world are responding to the urgent need to protect fresh water.  The book provides an updated road map for communities and organizations to take action on recognizing water and sanitation as human rights, phasing out the sale or use of bottled water, and protecting publicly financed, owned and operated water and wastewater services.

Two Comox Valley Communities – Cumberland and Comox – committed themselves to the protection of water in 2012 by becoming Blue Communities.  Maude will recognize their efforts as being among the first to make this commitment.  They have since been joined by communities that include 15 million people, including Paris, Montreal, Bern, Berlin, Munich, Thessaloniki, the World Council of Churches, and McGill University, among many others.

We recognize that October 22 is the morning after the election, but what better way to spend it than in the company of Maude and others who are concerned about our water?”, says Alice de Wolff, Steering Committee member, Comox Valley Council of Canadians.   Bruce Gibbons of Merville Water Guardians will co-chair the event and provide us with updates on the Union of BC Municipalities resolution to stop the approval of licenses for bottling and sale of groundwater.

About Maude Barlow.
As Naomi Klein says “Maude Barlow is one of our planet’s greatest water defenders”.  She is the international bestselling author of 19 books, including the bestselling Blue Water trilogy. She is the Honorary Chair of both the Council of Canadians and Washington-based Food and Water Watch. She is on the executive committee of the Global Alliance for the Rights of Nature and is a Councillor with the World Future Council. In 2008–09, she served as Senior Adviser on Water to the 63rd President of the UN General Assembly and was a leader in the campaign to have water recognized as a human right by the UN. In 2005, she won the prestigious Right Livelihood Award, which is known as the “alternative Nobel.”

This event is co-hosted by the Comox Valley Chapter of the Council of Canadians. This tour stop is sponsored in part by Laughing Oyster Books.

LNG, Fracking, and the Comox Valley Connection

More Than Just a Pipeline

Forum to explore LNG (Liquid Natural Gas), Fracking,

and the Comox Valley connection

February 27, 7 PM, Florence Filberg Centre, Courtenay

fracking.jpg

Last Tuesday (February 5) the Comox Valley Regional District heard a presentation by Steelhead LNG.  Company representatives outlined a pipeline proposal that would see 1000 km of pipe constructed to carry gas from northern BC to Powell River, under the Salish Sea, and through either the Comox Valley or a more southerly point to an LNG export facility on the West Coast of Vancouver Island.  The presentation made it clear that the project could have considerable impact on the Comox Valley and our sister communities along the Salish Sea and the Alberni Inlet.

On February 27, the public is invited to a forum discussion on why this is project involves more than just a pipeline. Five presenters will speak about  “LNG, Fracking, and the Comox Valley Connection.”

Smithers resident Michael Sawyer has spent decades as an environmental consultant in the oil and gas sector in Alberta, and will speak about the upstream effects of LNG projects (including LNG Canada and the Coastal GasLink pipeline slated to supply it), as well as the life-cycle costs to the public of such projects.

Richard Wright, Wilps Luutkudziiwus is the Spokesperson from Madii Lii Centre in Gitxsan territory in northern BC.  He will discuss the Indigenous rights context surrounding extractive projects, including issues with current federal and provincial approval processes, and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples.

Well-known journalist and filmmaker Damien Gillis will speak to the impact of fracking  (hydraulic fracturing) on land and water.

Bernadette and Keith Wyton of the Barkley Sound Alliance will focus on the project’s impact at its end-point at the Kwispaa LNG export facility. They will speak about the protections in place and opposition to the proposal.

The forum is open to all and will take place from 7-9 pm in the Conference Room of the Florence Filberg Centre, 411 Anderton Avenue in Courtenay. It is co-hosted by the Watershed Sentinel magazine, the Council of Canadians – Comox Valley Chapter, and the Glasswaters Foundation.

For more information contact Alice de Wolff, alicedewolff@gmail.com  or Delores Broten, 250-339-6117, delores@watershedsentinel.ca

Further reading:

Comox Valley Council of Canadians AGM

A Call to Council
A Critical Time to Come Together to Talk About Our Collective Impact

Comox Valley Council of Canadians – Call To Council

AGM & Community Activist Award

Thursday, November 22 – 7:00 pm Evergreen Lounge,

Filberg Centre 411 Anderton Ave., Courtenay

The Chapter is extending an invitation to CV Council of Canadian supporters to come together as concerned activists and join in an open discussion to strengthen, energize and focus our vision to move forward at this crucial time in history.

Our climate and earth are under siege. The recent United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change report says the next 12 years are crucial to holding the lifeline. 

Comox Valley has new municipal councillors and regional directors. How do we collaborate so our communities thrive and achieve sustainability?

Fresh water, oceans and wildlife need protection yet there are few mechanisms in place that make this possible. Provincially, nationally and globally the inequalities of wealth, and access to housing, nutrition and health care continues to grow. 

It is time to stop spending taxes opposing the rights of Indigenous peoples.

Populations are fleeing fires, floods, drought, hunger and thirst – symptoms creating climate refugees as never before. The rise of far right nationalism, immigration fears and closing of borders are growing concerns as world democracies become destabilized. 

How do we approach, handle and promote solutions to such overwhelming situations?

The goal of the AGM is to open the dialogue on how these issues relate to and can be addressed from the Comox Valley. We’ll discuss how the resources of the Council of Canadians can bring us together and focus our energies as we move forward into 2019.

Also, the highly anticipated 11th Annual Community Action Award will be presented this evening to an individual or group that has demonstrated progressive community action over the year and whose goals are consistent with those of the Council of Canadians.

We look forward to welcoming you!

A Presentation to Understanding the Referendum on Electoral Reform

referendumBritish Columbians will be voting this fall, from Oct. 22 through to Nov. 30 on whether to adopt an electoral system based on proportional representation (PR) for our provincial elections. The voting package from Elections BC will arrive in the mailboxes of all registered voters between Oct. 22 and Nov. 2, 2018.

In view of the referendum being held on what voting system we should use the CV Council of Canadians is pleased to be hosting an information open house with Barb Berger, Chair of Fair Vote Comox Valley on Sat., Oct. 27 from 1:30-3:30 pm in the Rotary Hall at the Filberg Centre, Courtenay.

Our electoral system in BC is old. Like the rest of Canada, we inherited our first-past-the-post (FPTP) system from the United Kingdom. We didn’t choose it. It was chosen for us when BC joined Confederation in 1871.

With every FPTP election there is increased frustration from people knowing that their votes will not count and nor will their concerns be represented in the legislature. The push back from the public to be heard on issues that affect their lives and their communities continues to grow.

How can Proportional Representation help? What is this referendum all about? Berger will address these questions and discuss the three PR choices on the ballot.

Also, Jamie Deith a systems designer, extremely knowledge on electoral systems will lead us through an enlightening questionnaire he’s designed to help determine what we value in a voting system and if we lean toward FPPT or PR.

Fair Vote Comox Valley and the CV Council of Canadians recognizes the historic opportunity to adopt a system that works for all of us – one that is fair, inclusive and engages all voters.

This fall, with our mail-in ballot, British Columbians can decide to strengthen democracy by choosing an electoral system that allows us all to be heard no matter where we are on the political spectrum.

Saturday, Oct. 27 from 1:30-3:30 pm.– doors open 1:00 pm. Rotary Room, Florence Filberg Centre, 411 Anderton Rd, Courtenay. Donations at the door.